Category Archives: climbing

Joy Trip Project

One of my favorite adventure blogs is James Mills’ Joy Trip Project. I’ve written about James before (see adventure journalism). He’s a first rate journalist who has turned his talents to the world of outdoor adventure in a series of fascinating podcasts. I like to download mine on iTunes and listen in the car. Always an inspiration.

Hilaree O'Neill
Hilaree O’Neill

A perfect example is this newly released interview with high altitude skier and mountaineer, Hilaree O’Neill, who climbs with the Northface team. Not only is she a mother of two small boys (3 & 5) but this year she and her team tackled Everest and its sister peak Lotse in a single push!
It’s a great story, just click this podcast below.

SPOILER ALERT: My favorite question from James: Between motherhood and mountaineering, what’s the bigger challenge? Hilaree: “Motherhood.” Go figure. joy trip project

 

This Joy Trip Project sponsored by: Patagonia, Rayovac, and New Belgium Brewing Co.

Dean Potter Interview

Dean Potter photo: Jim Hurst
Dean Potter photo: Jim Hurst
Dean Potter is an easy guy to write about, for all the wrong reasons. Not ‘wrong’ because they’re uninteresting. Far from it. Just wrong because they only scratch the surface of the man. When you do things as extraordinarily as Dean does them, it’s easy to get pigeonholed: Dare devil. Adrenalin junkie. Wild man. None of these reflect the man I met in Telluride last May. A man more visibly centered and at peace with himself than most of the twitchy film goers whispering about him.

photo by Andy Anderson
photo by Andy Anderson
If you aren’t familiar with Dean Potter, the mythology goes roughly like this. He’s a rock climber of singular abilities, who made a name for himself in Yosemite free soloing the big walls without protection, and with the kind of unrestrained attack that set records and left jaws hanging. From a young age, he was haunted by dreams of free fall. An impending death from great heights. And he seems to have shaped his life to confound these visions. Which is your first clue that the mettle of this man lies far beneath his outer accomplishments. Whereas most of us run from our fears (or at least shuffle sheepishly away) Dean ran towards his. Full on.
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